1912 – Newfoundland Name-Lore

The Newfoundland Quarterly.
Vol. XII.-N0. 1. JULY, 1912.

Newfoundland Name-Lore
By His Grace, Archbishop Howley.

On Sillers’ map (1671) the islands of St. Pierre, Miquelon and Langley are represented surrounded by a bank or shoal, and are named « Greene isles. »

On Thornton’s map (1689) we have the following: — [..], Langlou, Dunes (shown as an island) and Maquelan. All these islands are shown correctly in their places as they stand on our maps of today, except that at present the Dunes is but a strip of sand joining the islands of Miquelon and Langley. On the main land …

Lire la suite

1718 – Captain Taverner’s Second Report relating to Newfoundland

1718 – Selections from Captain Taverner’s Second Report relating to Newfoundland

The Bay of Maynelon [MIQUELON], affords a very good beeche for 400 boats, and Timber enough for building of Stages, the bay is Tolerably good for Ships to ride, in being clear ground, no Sea to hurt them, but what comes out of the Bay of Fortune; 14 Saile of ffrench Ships, have fishd in this place at Once, The ffrench accounted it one of their best fishing places, the last winter a great Storme, broke out the beech on the So. side of this Bay, into a large …

Lire la suite

1869 – What Is St. Pierre and How and Why Is the New Cable There?

New York Herald Monday, July 19, 1869
What Is St. Pierre and How and Why Is the New Cable There?

St. Pierre is a very little island – a mere speck in the blue sea. Its area is but one hundred and six square miles, and its permanent population but two thousand persons. But as it is a national rendezvous and shelter for the French boats that fish in these seas, its population is very movable in numbers as well as otherwise. It is one of three islands that compose the French colony of St. Pierre and Miquelon. There is …

Lire la suite

Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.